Art market

Savoy-Sarr report fails to dent tribal market, says Tefaf exhibitor

Title: Savoy-Sarr report fails to dent tribal market, says Tefaf exhibitor
Author: Anny Shaw
Media Outlet: The Art Newspaper
Publish Date: March 11, 2019

“Despite fears that the so-called Savoy-Sarr report could dampen the trade of African art, Didier Claes, a Brussels-based tribal art dealer and Tefaf Maastricht exhibitor, who was consulted for the study, says that the restitution debate is in fact invigorating the market. (…) “Quite the contrary,” he declares. “With these debates about restitution, we have never spoken so much about African art.””

Restitution Fears Unsettle the Trade in Tribal Arts

Title: Restitution Fears Unsettle the Trade in Tribal Art
Author: Scott Reyburn
Media Outlet: The New York Times
Publish Date: January 29 , 2019

“(…) “Over the last 100 years, it’s been the work of Western scientists, collectors and dealers that has preserved these pieces,” he added. “Now we are looking like crooks.”

(…) International auction sales of tribal art — a classification that also includes Oceanic, pre-Columbian and North American pieces — stand at about €80 million per year, according to Aurélien Cuenot, chief executive and co-founder of Artkhade, a specialist database devoted to this market. African art represents the biggest sector, achieving €38.8 million in 2017 (…) In December a carved wooden neckrest from the Luba-Shankadi of Congo sold for €1.7 million at Sotheby’s in Paris. Mr. Cuenot said it was still too early to determine how the shifting attitudes toward restitution had affected auction sales for African art. “We would have to wait until the end of the year,” he said, adding, “I don’t notice any effect on the market today.”

Looters Beware: The British Museum Is Leading an International Task Force Fighting the Illicit Trade in Egyptian Antiquities

Title: Looters Beware: The British Museum Is Leading an International Task Force Fighting the Illicit Trade in Egyptian Antiquities
Author: Javier Pes
Media Outlet: Artnet News
Publish Date: January 21, 2019

“The British Museum is taking on a new role: international watchdog for the trade of Egyptian and Nubian artifacts. The museum is employing a team of curators solely dedicated to spotting looted ancient treasure—a move that will have far-reaching implications for collectors, dealers, and other museums.

The London-based team of experts is leading an international task force monitoring the trade in antiquities from Egypt and Sudan. Some items may have been recently looted or stolen and therefore never reported missing; others could have been sold decades ago with fake provenances to unwitting collectors—and even other museums.”